The Importance of Probiotics After Antibiotics

HJ: I cannot even beging to express how important this article is.  If you do only one thing for your health in this lifetime, do not take antibiotics, but if you have or feel you must for some reason, then it is absolutely imperative that you supplement heavily with probiotics during and afterwards or you will undoubtedly contract a major case of candida, which will be one of the hardest things you will ever have to deal with in your life.  Heed my words… – Truth

Natural News

The importance of probiotics after antibiotics

by John McKiernan

(NaturalNews) Most of us have taken antibiotics to get rid of a nasty cold that turned into a secondary bacterial infection, or as a preventative measure after a surgery or some other injury. We take these powerful drugs because we are told by our healthcare professionals that we must. After all, who would want to risk a serious bacterial infection when it could be easily avoided? Antibiotics are great at what they do; they kill bacteria. Unfortunately, they are unable to discriminate between good bacteria and bad bacteria.

What your doctor hasn’t been telling you

There are over 100 trillion good bacteria in our bodies that play a vital role in our overall health and well-being, particularly to immune function and digestion. Many of these bacteria are destroyed by antibiotic treatments and therefore must be quickly replenished. The best way to do this is by consuming probiotics, which contain live bacteria that will repopulate the gut.

You will rarely come across a traditional doctor that even mentions this practice when prescribing antibiotics; however, if you neglect the good bacteria after a course of antibiotics, you are risking reinfection, as your immune system will be compromised. The best practice is to begin taking probiotics while taking antibiotics; however, you should wait at least a few hours after your dose of antibiotics to take a dose of probiotics.

Probiotic foods and supplements

Probiotics exist in various food products like yogurt and are found in particularly high concentrations in kefir. If you have access to raw (unpasteurized) milk, you can make your own kefir at home with some kefir grains, which will yield an enormous amount of probiotics. For most people who don’t have access to raw milk, store bought (pasteurized) kefir and yogurt still contain a fair amount of probiotics.

Read the rest of the article here: Natural News

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