Detox Your Dwelling and Purify Your Indoor Air With Plants

by Paul Fassa 

http://www.naturalnews.com/035593_indoor_air_plants_detox.html

(NaturalNews) The air quality in an airtight home or office is usually worse than outdoor air. Since a good deal of time is spent inside one’s home and/or office space, then measures to improve that air quality are in order.

Dwelling detox

It’s important to be aware of mold, what it looks like, and the hazards it presents to your health. If black mold is spotted, get rid of it right away. Homes in moist or high humidity areas are prone to mold issues. Leaky roofs, windows, plumbing, and cellars contribute toward creating toxic mold (http://www.naturalnews.com/033341_mold_indoor_air.html).

Toxic shellacs and thinners should be restricted to outdoor sheds if possible. They shouldn’t be in your home. Use your flyswatter and ditch the insect spray poisons. Those are extremely toxic and shouldn’t be in your home or even garage (http://www.naturalnews.com).

Keeping the house clean inside is important. But what you use for cleaning the house can be worse than collecting dust and dirt. Commercially produced household cleaning items pollute indoor air with their toxins. Get rid of them and use non-toxic soaps (http://www.naturalnews.com/028846_laundry_detergents_dioxane.html).

Chemical air freshening fragrances should be discarded. There are air treatment machines that you could research carefully to determine which one is suitable for you (http://www.naturalnews.com/033143_indoor_air_purification.html). Try to choose a machine that involves more than one method of purification.

Use high quality air filters for your central AC/forced hot air system, and change it seasonally. Indoor plants can do wonders to oxygenate your indoor air, making it fresher and healthier as well as creating a naturally aesthetic setting.

NASA’s chosen plants for purifying indoor air

The National Aeronautic and Space Agency (NASA) researched plants’ abilities to eliminate air pollutants, presumably to determine how to decorate a space station and help the air stay oxygenated and fresh.

NASA recommends placing 15 to 18 of your choices from their researched plants in an 1800 square foot or 167 square meter dwelling or office. Obviously, less are required for smaller spaces. Just make sure the plants are as large as possible for their types.

These plants can help reduce all sorts of serious air pollutants, even benzene, formaldehyde and trichloroethylene, as well as microbial pathogens. Living in low pollution areas still leaves you with chemicals released from particle boards and fiber glass insulation materials. The plants reduce air toxins and carbon dioxide while increasing oxygen levels and humidity.

You won’t need all the different types of indoor plants, of course. The options are yours from which to choose for monetary and aesthetic reasons. NASA’s choices are:

* English ivy (Hedera helix)
* Spider plant (Chlorphytum comosum)
* Golden pothos (Epipemnum aureum)
* Peace lily (Spathiphyllum Mauna Loa)
* Chinese evergreen (Aglaonema modestum)
* Bamboo or reed palm (Chamaedorea sefritzii)
* Snake plant (Sansevieria trifasciata)
* Heartleaf philodendron (Philodendron scandens oxycardium)
* Selloum philodendron (Philodendrum selloum)
* Elephant ear philodendron (Philodendrum domesticum)
* Red-edged dracaena (Dracaena marginata)
* Cornstalk dracaena (Dracaena fragrans Massangeana)
* Janet Craig dracaena (Dracaena deremensis Janet Craig
* Warneck dracaena (Dreacaena dermenisis Waneckii)
* Weeping fig (Ficus benjamina)

Aloe Vera plants received honorable mention as air cleaners. You could use the gooey jell from inside a leaf to treat minor burns.

A couple of these plants are poisonous if eaten. So consider that if you have pets or toddlers. Most of them are low maintenance, but a couple of them have their quirks. In addition to basic maintenance, being nice to plants and playing classical or quality new age music does increase their life force.

For more information on these plants, with pictures to help you identify them, go here (http://www.toptipspot.com/tips/health/howto/air-cleaning-plants.php).

Sources for this article include

http://www.zone10.com/nasa-study-house-plants-clean-air.html

http://www.blankees.com/house/plants/air_cleaners.htm

http://www.extension.umn.edu/yardandgarden/ygbriefs/h110indoorair.html

About the author:
Paul Fassa is dedicated to warning others about the current corruption of food and medicine and guiding others toward a direction for better health with no restrictions on health freedom. You can visit his blog at http://healthmaven.blogspot.com


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